Dehydrated refried beans

Discussion in 'Kitchen' started by Victor, Dec 6, 2018.

  1. Victor

    Victor Backpacker

    I've tried to find and buy dehydrated refried beans without any success. I guess that's what those preboiled and dehydrated beans are called. US hikers seem to eat a lot of those. Where can I buy them in Europe or Sweden?
  2. Mole

    Mole Thru Hiker

  3. Victor

    Victor Backpacker

    I did some from home boiled mung beans. But my dehydrated beans became moldy after just a month. To skip the hassle, I would prefer buying them trail-ready. It's odd that it's so difficult to get hold of them in Europe.
  4. tom

    tom Thru Hiker

    Its not beans but close enough. The 250gr come out at 100gr fully dryed (straight out of the pack) and keep very well. I do batches and pack them in 50gr portions and they are fine 6 month on. Rehydrate for about 2 hours and then just bring to the boil (or longer if shorter rehydration). Another option is home cooked Urid beans (they take many hours slow cooking after 12 hours soaking but are great when dryed with similar results like the lentils).
    IMG_20181208_224457~01.jpg
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  5. Victor

    Victor Backpacker

    I prefer going stoveless nowadays.
  6. tom

    tom Thru Hiker

    I've not tried to eat either one cold but worth a try. Can't see a reason one shouldn't. Probably soak a bit longer...
  7. Victor

    Victor Backpacker

    Some beans contain substances that require some boiling to become edible.
  8. Teepee

    Teepee Thru Hiker

    How long did you dry the beans for when they went mouldy?

    I find legumes take a lot longer than other foods. They hold on to some moisture in the core and look and feel dry....put some in storage and they will develop a mould. My favourite, Birds Eye peas, take a good 36 hours sometimes in the dehydrator. If I don't overdry them, they get either a white, or a black discolouration. Rehdrating though seems to have the opposite effect and they come 'back to life' in a few minutes.
  9. Victor

    Victor Backpacker

    I don't remember exactly but would estimate it was around 16 hours.
  10. Teepee

    Teepee Thru Hiker

    Might be worth another try with a longer time in if you can't find any for sale? I'd have a go myself, but don't really like them much.

    Have always wondered what dried baked beans would be like though.
  11. Victor

    Victor Backpacker

    I find it hard to justify having the oven on for more than 24 hours straight. Then buying salami sounds like a more environmentally friendly idea.
  12. cathyjc

    cathyjc Thru Hiker

    Baked beans dry OK but the flavour is very 'sweet' when re-hydrated IMHO, and they tend to fall apart too when re-hydrating.

    You cannot "over" dehydrate - so drying for extra time won't spoil anything. You can however 'under' dry - hence the mould.
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  13. tom

    tom Thru Hiker

    These lentils are cooked already - so eating cold should be ok. Drying time is 6 to 7 hours spread out thin - I put them on a scale to check that they are fully dehydrated (100gr for 1 pack). The small size helps obviously with the reasonably short time.
    Victor likes this.
  14. Teepee

    Teepee Thru Hiker

    Perhaps the beans had better stay in the tin then. That's saved me from scraping dried juice from the fan. :)

    Beg to differ on the overdrying though. The longer foods stay in, the more flavour leaves the food and the more vitamins get destroyed. This is more important for us soft southerners over the border, as we haven't yet evolved to no longer need any vitamins in our diet :D
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  15. cathyjc

    cathyjc Thru Hiker


    Beans - perhaps adding some salt when re-hydrating might re-adjust the flavour - cheap enough to try :D.

    Ha Ha. I'm cautious now after a trip (with family) when a home made/de-hydrated Prawn Biryani was utterly vile - rancid and 'off' - our evening meal was buried, and we all went a bit hungry - big loss of face :eggonface::sorry:….
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  16. Teepee

    Teepee Thru Hiker

    Off Prawn Biryani can go bad in a big way I'd imagine. :vomit: Thankfully, I've never had that. Only ever had to throw peas when they went mouldy, but have struggled with stale dried food a few times; that's now solved by vacuum storage.

    Wondering if Pease pudding would be a reasonable refried beans sub? Along the lines of Tom's suggestion.
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018
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  17. Gadget

    Gadget Thru Hiker

    Did it go stale on the trail?... or in storage, at home?
    I am wary of it going stale in storage, so I keep it in the freezer.
    cathyjc likes this.
  18. Teepee

    Teepee Thru Hiker

    Both. After around 3 weeks, I find that foods like dried mince (my staple meat and protien source when out) starts to taste quite stale. Veg is a lot more forgiving, but still loses it's flavour.
    I was the same as you, always froze dried meat and would make meal packets up all combined and then freeze them. I found though that when they are thawed, they go stale even quicker. The longest lasting in practice was vac sealed in Mylar pouches with an oxygen absorber sachet. This led to vac sealing everything in jars and this has been better than all the other methods for preserving flavour. All food stays fresh tasting for months and my meals taste better now than ever since switching.
  19. cathyjc

    cathyjc Thru Hiker

    I freeze all my home dehydrated food - just in case/belt and braces.
    Mostly seems to work and I've had a few "left over" meals come out a couple of years later - OK. Strong flavours - curries etc.
    ( -I don't get out as regularly as @Teepee :sour:)
  20. Stuart

    Stuart Trail Blazer

    If you mash the beans after cooking then the dehydration (and rehydration) time is drastically reduced in my experience. Same with fruit such as currants. I imagine it's the relatively hard skin that keeps moisture in. But I'm using a dehydrator not an oven.

    Seeing as you mentioned environmental impact.... The impact of leaving the oven on for a few hours is nowhere near that of the production of any red meat product, especially a processed one like salami. You might also be interested to know that the World Health Organisation classes processed meat products like ham, bacon, salami and frankfurts as a Group 1 carcinogen (known to cause cancer) along with tobacco, arsenic and certain pesticides. So I'd experiment with the beans!!

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