Where recreation meets conservation

Discussion in 'Hiking Chat' started by oreocereus, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. Bmblbzzz

    Bmblbzzz Backpacker

    There was briefly a waste-food restaurant not far from us here. It's now a pub with trendy pizzas (actually, the pizzas are good and not too expensive).
  2. Bmblbzzz

    Bmblbzzz Backpacker

    A friend I went on a short walk with back at Easter had an old Evian (or Vittel or similar) bottle which she'd been using since the mid-90s. Wow! That's just an ordinary bottle, made to be disposable, and while her case is exceptional I'm sure the tougher bottles and bags for life (or are they bag-for-lifes?!) can easily be made to last a similar time. If only people don't through them away when they get a bit dirty, which of course is what normally happens.
    oreocereus likes this.
  3. Padstowe

    Padstowe Section Hiker

    Don't get me wrong, soup kitchens, food banks etc.. do good jobs, it's a bad outlook for society that these things exist as I believe there is no need for any kind of poverty in the world anymore. But this is a different question with an all together range of answers. There are alot of people out there trying to do good things to combat these problems & as the broadcast says the lady while trying to solve a solution for excess food found out more about poverty in the area. Imo using one thing to help another doesn't help with the solution to either problem.
    Free food, to me it doesn't exist, what I may get for no monetary cost to me has no relevance to the cost it has been to someone & even somewhere. It may seem like a pessimistic outlook, but if we take all these food banks, kitchens, apps etc.. they only touch a small amount of the waste generated for the simple reason of lost profit. Small business's are more likely to give to these things while bigger chains will use a reduced to clear isle.
    I once knew a bakery that after finding out that their bins were done every night started throwing bleach over their produce in the bin, supermarkets who started only leaving their bins out at the time the collection was, or leaving them locked outside, this was all done with fear of loosing profit, no thought that people couldn't afford it just thought that they might be loosing custom.
    What we have is a by-product of the system we live in, but that brings it round to a political question. Not an easy question, with no easy answers.
  4. oreocereus

    oreocereus Section Hiker

    Yes, there is a lot of waste in our systems. These are good solutions to a dysfunctional society. Ideally we wouldn’t need soup kitchens, or charities of people
    Volunteering their time to try and reduce our huge amount waste. It should be possible - but I can’t see it happening in an individualist, profit-driven society that resembles our own.
  5. Bmblbzzz

    Bmblbzzz Backpacker

    From what I've heard (from people with knowledge of retail) there are a couple of reasons for the bleaching of bins. One is that this is a common theft mechanism. Employee throws out of date stuff in bins, puts other stuff in there too, gets mates to "collect" it.

    Arguably if your employees are stealing from you, that's a sign of worse things wrong, but it isn't necessarily done just to stop the homeless/freegans/etc eating unsellables.
  6. oreocereus

    oreocereus Section Hiker

    When I was working my first supermarket job, coworkers were fired for eating a few of the chocolate bars that were being thrown for being out of date (no punishment for the manager who hadn't ensured proper stock rotation or put them on clearance).

    Maybe i'm overly optimistic, but it seems pretty unlikely that the number of people throwing extras in the bins for their mates to collect would make a pretty marginal dent on profits - at least when weighted against the cost to the opportunistic dumpster diver who is presumably struggling financially. If your employees are stealing from you, then you can deal with the individual responsible, rather than the innocent and hungry dumpster diver.

    Of course, we shouldn't be living in a time where dumpster diving is a means of sustenance.
    cathyjc and Padstowe like this.
  7. Padstowe

    Padstowe Section Hiker

    I've worked in food retail shops, food retail on markets i've even walked away from a job when they wanted me to bury oranges cause there was too many that year. There can be many reasons given the most common is a health & safety. But as someone who's been on both sides I personal don't believe the excuses used, as regards the bakery mentioned, if they are doing it because they say their employees are stealing bread & cakes or because of health reasons. A bit of personal thinking usually prevails in a common truth imo.
    In law, any taking from a bin can be seen as theft as its not your property to take.
  8. oreocereus

    oreocereus Section Hiker

    In my first week of moving to the UK, I did a 2 day temp job at a large school kitchen.

    [​IMG]

    After one lunch service (i think about 2000-3000 heads - i think there was an event on) all of these bins were full of pasta. You can't tell, but the pasta was still hot.
  9. oreocereus

    oreocereus Section Hiker

    It's a cynicism and individualism taken to absurdity.
  10. Padstowe

    Padstowe Section Hiker

    How so? Do you have personal knowledge of the subject of being on the needing end, cause if not your post works for you imo.
  11. oreocereus

    oreocereus Section Hiker

    I've dumpster dived to afford the luxury of travelling, and we used to dumpster dive as students (though it was at a time where more and more places started padlocking their bins). I don't think the former genuinely counts as a need - afterall I had the luxury of knowing if I made my way back to family or friends I wouldn't be completely out of luck (and if something had happened I had the safety net of knowing I could be bailed out).

    I mean the policy of bleaching bins and the like is very cynical.
  12. Padstowe

    Padstowe Section Hiker

    Sorry I may have misunderstood
    you, am still not sure.
    Most people have somewhere to go back to, this doesn't mean they can or even want too. You are right, your actions were from want not need. I've done both, I've put my hand in bins from want to save money & I've dine it from hunger, am not going to tell you I know the script cause all I can say in truth is I know my own story. To be honest what I always hated most was seeing old people who should be looked after by society doing this, but thats my pet hate.
  13. oreocereus

    oreocereus Section Hiker

    We're on the same side here, i was writing a bit vaguely perhaps. There's an absurd amount of waste in a society that is hostile to it's most vulnerable. My anger is directed at businesses and governments who make it harder for those struggling to survive, get a nights sleep or eat safely.
    Padstowe and cathyjc like this.
  14. thin bloke

    thin bloke Summit Camper

  15. cathyjc

    cathyjc Thru Hiker

  16. Bmblbzzz

    Bmblbzzz Backpacker

    Trying to imagine non-aerial flight...
    dovidola likes this.
  17. dovidola

    dovidola Section Hiker

    Honister Theme Park. Let's hope there's the commitment and funding to widen the pass and its approach roads into a proper dual carriageway with attendant car parks, accommodation and other amenities to facilitate access for all.

    Alfred Wainwright, in his Guides to the Lakeland Fells, mentions with relief the scuppered plan to build a motor road through Sty Head pass in the 1960s. The man was a prophet - just imagine the roadside 'initiatives' which could now festoon that hallowed place.

    If there's one thing this teaches us, it's that wild country (in these islands at least) is only wild because it is difficult of access. Let's keep it so.
    Enzo and cathyjc like this.

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