Which 4 Season Tent?

ADz

Thru Hiker
I bought a Scarp1 earlier in year with intention of using it over Winter (I think I prefer to be more cocooned when cold/wet/windy) and maybe a few trips over Summer however I ended up flogging it (At a loss) before getting out as I needed the coin. I did and still do have intention of buying another I really like the look/design for a tent.

I am however looking for other considerations. If you were buying a Winter tent for yourself now which would you go for and why? (Max of 1.5kg without pegs and has inner)

In all likelihood I will be sticking with the Scarp but still interested in other views/preferences or any new ones I have missed.
 
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Ray Smith

Summit Camper
Maybe consider the Trekkertent Edge 1. Comes in at about 1.25kg and a few folks on here now own one.

Was looking at the Scarp1 and nearly had my mind set until I seen the TT Edge. It was designed as a Scottish 4 season tent and looks to cope with very high winds and weather very well.

Have mine on order now after seeing one in the flesh and cant wait to hopefully use it over the winter.

Have a read through the Edge owners thread by Ross and if you also go to Vids& Media section I done a quick film of the tent when I got to see it a few weeks ago.

Maybe a tent worth considering.
 
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Beamo

Summit Camper
It's the Edge for me, I've never had mine out in snow or really windy conditions yet but I can't see that being a problem. I got a new inner (inverted T zip) for our recent trip to the Cairngorms and it makes a big difference, but I think it's now going to become standard.
Ross had his on a trip to the lakes earlier this year when we pitched in a hoolie at Small Water and it looked solid.

I know there's a wait and people sometimes get frustrated with the lack of communication from Marc, but you get a a great tent when it arrives.
 
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EM - Ross

Thru Hiker
My preference is the Edge 1 but then all my gear is my preference so not sure how useful that is as our gear lists are vastly different. I have seen a Scarp 1 & thought it to flimsy for 4 season. The only person I know who's got one agrees.

However your reasons for choosing a Scarp for winter are based on what you do & where you'll be heading & I guess other feedback as plenty folk use them year around. You choose one once & you're close to doing so again. Maybe it's destiny - go for it!

Check out the Scarp owners thread on OM if you haven't already. I guess the ones that get wrecked may just have been out in the perfect storm.

If you consider the Edge remember it's got it's downsides too - it weighs more than 500g, it's not made of Cuben & it's not American. :)
 
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Robin

Moderator
Staff member
Another tent to consider is the Force Ten Nitro Lite 200 which is a classic tunnel tent but very light at 1.46kg without pegs, although it's not really suitable for people over 6ft.

As you might expect, I've made a few tweaks to mine :angelic: https://blogpackinglight.wordpress.com/nitro-mods/ But it's still good in the untweaked form.
 
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Robin

Moderator
Staff member
I have a Scarp as well BTW. In winter I'd use the crossing poles if there were snow. It's a great tent. Again I've made loads of mods on mine https://blogpackinglight.wordpress.com/scarp-mods/

I have no experience of the Trekkertent Edge, but, to me, it looks an excellent choice for a winter/high mountain tent. If I was starting from scratch, it's probably the one I'd choose, although the Nitro Lite has more room.
 
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Robin

Moderator
Staff member
If I was to sell my Edge which would you recommend - the Scarp or Nitro?

I've used the Scarp on three TGO Challenges. As an all round package, I prefer the Scarp. The Scarp has a compact footprint and is more adaptable on difficult pitches as you can sleep with your head at either end, which you can't with the Nitro Lite. It sheds wind in any direction and two porches means that you can always have a sheltered space. You can pitch it in a jiffy and it's really easy to get a perfect pitch. My biggest criticism is the quality control can be iffy, although mine was fine. Others have had some some small blemishes. The most recent materials seem to be a modest improvement though.

However, the Nitro Lite is a really good tent and has a lot of room.
 

bumbly

Section Hiker
I love my Scarp so I am sort of biased and the only thing I would consider replacing it with is an Edge for similar uses. One thing I would mention is a traditional tunnel design like the Nitro can be awkward for winter use. You might be spending a lot of time in a tent during winter. I'll often get up before sleeping time and/or well before dawn for a leg stretch and to "make a deposit" and maybe have a wander about while making dinner/breakfast outside the tent and snuggle back inside until packing up time. If you have a 2 door affair and the weather is changeable you can easily get mostly in the tent with boots outside while still going about your business. Being able to do the same in a tunnel only really works if you are quite short. I have found too that you will be in the middle of doing something outside and realise the stuffsac with the thingamabob is always down at the foot end :).

When comparing weights of the options remember about pegs included or not in manufacturer weights. In winter you are likely to want more pegouts than the minimum and perhaps sturdier snow capable ones. You might need more of a variety too as it isn't like you can always count on being able to use poles/axes and so on in the ground conditions you might get on a uk trip.
 

Mole

Thru Hiker
MSR Twin Sisters?
Think he wants an inner?

I love my Scarp so I am sort of biased and the only thing I would consider replacing it with is an Edge for similar uses. One thing I would mention is a traditional tunnel design like the Nitro can be awkward for winter use. You might be spending a lot of time in a tent during winter. I'll often get up before sleeping time and/or well before dawn for a leg stretch and to "make a deposit" and maybe have a wander about while making dinner/breakfast outside the tent and snuggle back inside until packing up time. If you have a 2 door affair and the weather is changeable you can easily get mostly in the tent with boots outside while still going about your business. Being able to do the same in a tunnel only really works if you are quite short. I have found too that you will be in the middle of doing something outside and realise the stuffsac with the thingamabob is always down at the foot end :).

When comparing weights of the options remember about pegs included or not in manufacturer weights. In winter you are likely to want more pegouts than the minimum and perhaps sturdier snow capable ones. You might need more of a variety too as it isn't like you can always count on being able to use poles/axes and so on in the ground conditions you might get on a uk trip.
Agree
Much prefer a side entrance myself for those reasons.

2 porches is very useful. I have during a serious early morning rainstorm used one side for a cat-hole....

Never used my Scarp in snow, but had it numerous times in winds as strong as any I've camped in.

Also, it pitches so quickly compared to any other hooped tent I.ve used
 

EM - Ross

Thru Hiker
One thing I would mention is a traditional tunnel design like the Nitro can be awkward for winter use.

Outside of full geodesics the best winter tent I've had was a tunnel - Macpac Minaret. I'm hoping the Edge will at least equal it's capabilities. Despite many years using an Akto, then a Hubba for a year & now the Edge I'm still getting used to side entrances. In tunnels in really bad weather I've rolled back the inner to dig a cat hole. Unlike a lot of tunnels the door is great in deep snow as it can be opened from the top on both sides allowing you to step out without snow falling in or having to be cleared first.
 

ADz

Thru Hiker
He should be more specific then :)

I thought I had bud. Didn't specifically say with inner but did reference the scarp and wanting to be more cocooned ;)

I think it's more psychological, I think I just feel more safe/secure in a hooped/poled tent when weather is getting worse. I love my tarps and tarp-tents though but only in warmer/less volatile months. I haven't got out much in hills over Winter months though so want to try and venture out this year with a nice sturdy but light tent (outer/inner/poled).

I do have various tents/tarp tents but looking for something new. I got that BA Flycreek clone but that was really for two person camping on fair weather. I'm hoping to get out on random nights and not care about conditions (Within reason, dont want to be chasing heavy storms).
 

ADz

Thru Hiker
The trekker tent does look nice. Wait time of 4 weeks isn't too bad. I tried to contact owner though to see if that was still accurate over Winter but he seems to have removed contact page.
 

Diddi

Thru Hiker
Another tent to consider is the Force Ten Nitro Lite 200 which is a classic tunnel tent but very light at 1.46kg without pegs, although it's not really suitable for people over 6ft.

As you might expect, I've made a few tweaks to mine :angelic: https://blogpackinglight.wordpress.com/nitro-mods/ But it's still good in the untweaked form.
I have the older version Nitro lite 100 in great condition :).
.
If i was to buy myself another one sub 1.5 tho for me it would probably be the Terra nova supalite for weight and space.
 

ADz

Thru Hiker
Give Trekkertent a call, Marc is very helpful

Thanks but have changed mind. It's now a toss up between the Akto and Scarp. I used to really want the Akto a few years ago but started to get into lightweight tents/tarps etc and it went out of mind. Just recently had a look again and old feelings have come back.

The Akto is a little heavier than I would want in a tent but the strength and quality is superb from what I have seen and read.

I'm now in two minds between the Akto and the Scarp. They both have their pro's and cons.
 
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